‘ Bank of America Offers to pay £13 Billion to Settle Investigation into its Sales of Mortgage-Backed Securities ‘

#AceFinanceNewsUNITED STATES (Wall Street) – July 16 – Bank of America has offered to pay $13 billion to settle an investigation into its sales of mortgage-backed securities (MPA) 

060614bank

060614bank


Citing people familiar with the matter, the Wall Street Journal reported that the bank met with the Justice Department Tuesday. The meeting did not yield any progress toward a final deal, however.
Bank of America had previously offered $12 billion to settle the probe. The DOJ countered with a $17 billion settlement, according to Reuters.Talks between the bank and the government have been acrimonious. Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan requested to meet with Attorney General Eric Holder last month to hash out a deal, but Holder refused, saying the parties were too far apart for the talks to be productive.

At $13 billion, the bank’s offer would equal the payoutagreed to last year by JPMorgan. That settlement was the largest with a single entity in US history.
JP Morgan

(IBTimes October 20 2013) Reported that JPMorgan has agreed to pay one of the largest financial penalties in history after sealing a tentative $13bn deal with the US Department of Justice to put an end to a raft of government mortgage product related probes.According to sources cited by Reuters, although JPM has reached a bumper deal with authorities, the investment banking giant is not free of criminal liability and will have to continue to cooperate in criminal inquiries into individuals involved in the conduct at issue.At the beginning of the month, JPM’s  chief executive Jamie Dimon met US Attorney General Eric Holder to thrash out an original $11bn (£6.8bn, €8bn) deal to end the raft of mortgage-securities investigations in the investment bank.The bank already stumped up nearly $1bn in fines related to the London Whale trading scandal, which has cost the bank billions of dollars in legal losses.

On the same day JPM was ordered to refund $300m to customers after US regulators ruled that two million clients were harmed by the bank’s debt collection and other credit card practices.

Regulators also said that there were errors in the way the investment bank pursued customers through the court. However the refund order is not a fine, so regulators and prosecutors can still slap JPM with financial penalties in the future.

Only a few days ago, JPM revealed being hit by $9.2bn worth of legal expenses which resulted in the US banking giant posting its first ever quarterly loss under chief executive Dimon.

The legal expenses, which worked out as $7.2bn after taxes, include money JPM is setting aside for future settlements with authorities.

“While we expect our litigation costs should abate and normalise over time, they may continue to be volatile over the next several quarters,” said Dimon in a statement.

JPM was not ready to avail for comment at the time of publication. 
 

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#J.PMorgan : ” Jamie Dimon Reprieve and Given `$1.5 Million’ and `Treated ‘ with `Additional’ $18.5 Million in Restrictive Stock”

#AceFinanceNews says `JPMorgan’ gives `CEO Jamie Dimon‘ a raise despite shelling out $20 bln in fines

Published time: January 24, 2014 21:02 

Edited time: January 25, 2014 02:21
Jamie Dimon (Reuters / Larry Downing)Jamie Dimon (Reuters / Larry Downing)
  It was only a year ago that JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon was getting his pay docked by millions of dollars. Now, though, the company is giving their chief executive a raise.

Despite the fact that JPMorgan was hit with $20 billion worth of fines during 2013, Dimon will receive $1.5 million for the year. That base salary is virtually unchanged from the year before, but the company will also pay him an additional $18.5 million in restricted stock, according to a public filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

According to CNBC, some board members were divided over the possibility of raising Dimon’s compensation levels. Those opposed cited the record levels of fines the company was ordered to pay out as a reason to keep his salary where it was, while others believed Dimon deserved a raise due to the difficult landscape he was operating in.

Just last year, Dimon had his pay slashed from $23 million to $11.5 million following revelations in the ‘London Whale’ scandal that showed the company’s traders manipulated bank records in order to cover up $6.2 billion in losses. As a result, JPMorgan agreed to pay nearly $1 billion in fines to settle the case against it.

Over the course of 2013, JPMorgan also settled cases involving its role in selling bad loans that precipitated the 2008 financial crisis, including a $13 billion agreement with the Department of Justice announced in November.

As RT noted last year, this fine was more than triple the $4 billion payout that BP oil company paid for its role in the Gulf Coast oil spill. JPMorgan was tagged for overhauling the quality of the mortgage bonds it sold to investors such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac between 2005 and 2007.

The terms of the settlement dictate that the bank will pay more than $6 billion to reimburse investors, put $4 billion towards a mortgage relief program for affected homeowners, and $2 billion to settle civil cases unfolding in five states.

In spite of all these penalties – the company was also included in the group of banks fined 1.7 billion euros for manipulating lending rates – JPMorgan’s stock price has risen about 22 percent over the last year. Following a quarterly loss for the first time in 10 years during the third quarter of 2013, the company recently reported a profit of $5.28 billion in the fourth quarter.

 

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Elizabeth Warren: “What She Had to Say About JP Morgan’s CEO Jamie Dimon”

#AceFinanceNews says on Saturday night at 9:00 PM/EST Bloomberg aired an extra special episode of “Political Capital with Al Hunt,” his guest is none other than Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), and she had some fairly blunt things to say about JP Morgan‘s CEO, Jamie Dimon.

English: Wall Street sign on Wall Street

English: Wall Street sign on Wall Street (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Warren was elected on crusading against Wall Street malfeasance, and JP Morgan is Wall Street’s bad boy right now. The bank has paid $20 billion in legal fees to the government over the last year —that’s enough to pay the New York Yankees for 2o years — and just this week paid out $1.7 billion for failing to alert authorities of  their former client, Bernie Madoff‘s infamous decades long Ponzi scheme.

What’s more, knowing that Madoff was a fraud, JPM got rid of their $275 million exposure to Madoff shortly before he was arrested in December 2008.

When asked whether Jamie Dimon should be replaced as a result of these issues, Warren said: “Look, the real question is, do you have somebody who has shown they understand there were problems in the past and that they have a different plan going forward? What JPMorgan Chase and the other large financial institutions have done is they have continued to get bigger and bigger and load up more and more on risk…I’m waiting for him to demonstrate that understanding… And he’s had a long, long time.”

One thing Dimon can understand, however, is the health of his bank. JPM’s shares are up 28 percent over the last 12 months, and analysts expect the bank to have pulled in $23.4 billion in revenues when it reports Q4 earnings next week — a small improvement from Q3, and more than any other big bank.

Official portrait of United States Senator (R-OK).

Official portrait of United States Senator (R-OK). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So JPM can handle the lawsuits in stride, but Warren cannot. Just this week, after JP Morgan’s settlement, she teamed up with Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) to introduce a new bill called the Truth In Settlements Act.

Basically, it would require the Justice Department and other agencies handling settlements against corporations to be transparent about their negotiations, and make agreements easy to find online (you can watch a video of her speech on the floor of the house below).

Under this new law, regulators and law enforcement agencies would still be able to use confidential settlements, but companies would have to disclose how often they are used and why.

Now, since the Justice Department has said that it’s going to continue going after not just JP Morgan, but also other Wall Street banks for issues dating back to the financial crisis, it’s easy to see where Warren’s coming from with this bill. The New York Times reported this week that Wall Street banks could pay up to $50 billion to “buy peace” with the government.

“When you dig below the surface, settlements that seem tough and fair can look like sweetheart deals,” said Warren. “If we expect government agencies to hold companies accountable for breaking the law. Then we the public must be able to keep agencies accountable for enforcing the law. We can’t do that if we’re kept in the dark.”

 

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