`Investor’s Eye up the next `International Currency ‘ of the Chinese Yuan’

#AceFinanceNews says that `Chinese Yuan can become dominant world reserve currency according to the latest survey

Published time: March 01, 2014 12:15
Reuters / Kacper PempelReuters / Kacper Pempel
The Chinese yuan can overtake the dollar as the leading international reserve currency, a new poll of institutional investors indicates.

The authors of the survey, conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit and commissioned by State Street financial services, polled 200 senior executives at institutional investors with knowledge of their exposure to yuan assets. Half of the respondents were from the firms headquartered in mainland China (including Hong Kong and Taiwan) and the other half were based elsewhere.

The report accompanying the survey points out that by the end of 2013, the yuan has risen to become the second-most-used trade financing currency and ninth-most-used currency for payments globally.

Image from statestreet.comImage from statestreet.com

A majority – 53 percent of respondents said that they believe the yuan will one day surpass the dollar as the top currency in international holdings of foreign-exchange reserves. In China 62 percent expressed this opinion, compared to 43 percent of respondents outside the country.

Last May International Monetary Fund analysis showed that the dollar had slumped to a 15-year low, heightening concerns that it may lose that status as global reserve.

Chinese officials are diligently working on sustaining their national currency, promoting it beyond the frontier.

In October 2013, the government of China agreed a pilot program to create a UK-based yuan hub that allows London investors to buy up to $13.1 billion (80 billion yuan) of stocks, bonds and money market instruments directly, avoiding Hong Kong transactions.

The move gave the yuan a firmer footprint in Europe and helped to overcome the euro in December, becoming the second most widely used currency in global trade.

Only 11 percent of respondents have said that they do not expect the yuan to become a major reserve currency, a split between 16 outside China and six onshore, according to the poll. Among the former, the most often cited reasons are that the yuan will never enjoy enough liquidity across all asset classes to offer a viable option as a reserve currency, and that people will not trust the yuan as a store of value, the survey says.

The very few pessimists from China-head-quartered institutions, meanwhile, say that people would be “concerned about future policies of the Chinese government and opposition from other economic powers, such as the US, the EU and Japan.”

But the consensus is that one day it will be a yuan world, according to the survey.

“As China’s economic influence grows, the global importance of the renminbi (yuan) will become magnified. Indeed, while for decades it has been a ‘green-back world’, dominated by the US dollar as the world’s primary reserve currency, many think a ‘red back world’, in which the renminbi enjoys premier status, is increasingly a possibility,” the survey’s authors concluded.

A report on RT back in December 2013 stated:

The yuan has replaced the euro to become the second most widely used currency in global trade in 2013, according to the SWIFT network responsible for international financial transactions.

The share of the yuan in global trade finance has jumped from 1.89 percent in January 2012 to 8.66 percent in the form of letters of credit and collections in October 2013, the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) data shows.

The share of trade settlements in the euro fell from 7.87 percent to 6.64 percent in the same period. The US dollar still leads with 81.08 percent of foreign trade payments using the American currency in October.

The most active yuan users are Chinese and Hong Kong companies which account for about 80 percent of the total foreign trade operations in the yuan. The remaining 20 percent is spread among Singapore (12%), Germany (2%), Australia (2%) and other countries (4%).

“The renminbi is clearly a top currency for trade finance globally and even more so in Asia,” Franck de Praetere, SWIFT’s Singapore-based head of payments and trade markets for Asia-Pacific, commented in a statement.

#AFN2014 

RT 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

#acefinancenews, #asia, #china, #chinese-yuan, #currency, #economist-intelligence-unit, #hong-kong, #london, #reserve-currency, #state-street, #united-states