Consumers Rights & Fair Debt Collection

Vintage Ad #1,807: The Dapper Debt Collector

Vintage Ad #1,807: The Dapper Debt Collector (Photo credit: jbcurio)

The Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Justice, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed a joint amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting consumers’ ability to protect their rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act by suing debt collectors.

The amicus brief urges the Supreme Court to overturn a decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  In this case, a consumer, Olivea Marx, sued a debt collector, General Revenue Corporation, that had contacted her employer to get information about her employment status.  Marx believed that the debt collector’s conduct had violated the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, but she lost the case.  The Tenth Circuit ruled that Marx was responsible for paying more than $4,500 to cover the debt collector’s litigation costs, even though she had brought the case in good faith.

The amicus brief argues that the Tenth Circuit’s decision was inconsistent with the terms of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which specifies that consumers who win lawsuits against debt collectors may recover their litigation costs from the defendants, but that consumers who lose these cases must pay defendants’ litigation costs only if the consumers sued in bad faith or for purposes of harassment.  Theamicus brief also argues that these provisions of the Act advance Congress’ intent to help consumers deter abusive debt collection practices by bringing private enforcement actions in good faith.  By contrast, the Tenth Circuit’s ruling would create a disincentive to prosecute private enforcement actions, the brief states.

https://twitter.com/AceDebtNews/status/239717719447064577 

#collection-agency, #debt-collection-practices, #fair-debt-collection, #fair-debt-collection-practices, #fair-debt-collection-practices-act, #federal-trade-commission, #general-revenue-corporation, #lawsuit, #supreme-court-of-the-united-states, #united-states-consumer-financial-protection-bureau, #united-states-court-of-appeals-for-the-tenth-circuit

Special Offers Are Not As Special As You Think

English: Frame of an animation by the U.S. Fed...

English: Frame of an animation by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/ecards/phishing/index.html intended to educate citizens about phishing tactics. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Federal Trade Commission is mailing 9,282 refund checks to consumers who were deceived by false promises that they could earn real income if they bought and followed the “Stefanchik Program” to buy and sell privately held promissory notes and mortgages. The FTC alleged that claims made by John Stefanchik and his company, Beringer Corporation, were false and unsubstantiated, and that most consumers made no money at all. The refunds are a result of a court settlement resolving a money judgment against the defendants.

More than $855,000 is being returned to consumers; each payment will be $92.16. Consumers who receive the checks from the FTC’s refund administrator should cash them within 60 days of the date they were issued.

This article provided by the FTC started me thinking about HOW and WHY people click links and sign-up to what seems impossible, on the face of it!

My conclusions were quite revealing as in most cases, people l spoke to say! ” Well it might have been true and l could have made a lot of money! The key reason people apply for any special offer ” It might have been true” but dig a little deeper and you find out that it was only a hope!

I have received a lot of ” Special Offers” look at where they are from and Google website details or even their email in some cases and check it out! Everyone is either offering at a cost per month to give you the perfect way to obtain, information on HOW to make money online!

In fact the only people l have found that make money are those that charge you $79.95 per month and you get a FREE DVD well how can paying $79.95 per month be FREE? So the truth is we BELIEVE what others tell us and we WANT it to make us millions!

REMEMBER: Google AD Words make Google more than you make as every time someone clicks your link, you pay Google $1 and you earn once the person on search to your link ” Buys Your Product” not before.

So WHY do you even THINK these people will be any different and will give you something for nothing!

A UK programme l watch is called Hustle and their favourite phrase is:

” We give people nothing for something and not something for nothing”

Well that answers my question but everyone wants to BELIEVE one day, it will be a truthful SPECIAL OFFER!

#beringer-corporation, #consumer, #federal-trade-commission, #ftc, #google, #john-stefanchik, #safari, #stefanchik-program

More than $723,000 being returned to consumers

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commis...

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commission. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Federal Trade Commission mailed more than 13,000 refund checks to consumers who were allegedly deceived by a company that claimed it would negotiate with lenders to change the consumers’ mortgages and make them more affordable. To resolve FTC charges, First Universal Lending and its owners agreed to an order banning them from the mortgage relief services business.

The FTC alleged that the operators of First Universal Lending encouraged homeowners to stop making mortgage payments. The defendants charged consumers up-front fees, but then did little or nothing to help them, the agency charged.

The checks were mailed by an administrator working for the FTC. More than $723,000 was returned to consumers. The amount varied based upon the amount of each consumer’s loss. Those who receive checks from the FTC’s refund administrator should cash them on or before October 6, 2012. The FTC never requires consumers to pay money or provide information before redress checks can be cashed. Consumers with questions should call the refund administrator, Gilardi & Co., LLC, at 1-888-251-6825, or visit www.FTC.gov/refunds.

To learn how to avoid mortgage help relief scams, read the FTC’s Mortgage Assistance Relief Scams: Another Potential Stress for Homeowners in Distress and Mortgage Payments Sending You Reeling? Here’s What to Do.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics.

#confidence-trick, #consumer, #consumer-topics, #federal-trade-commission, #ftc, #limited-liability-company, #mortgage-loan, #unfair-business-practices

Protecting People From Scams – Sweepstakes

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commis...

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commission. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Federal Trade Commission mailed 503 refund checks to consumers who were allegedly tricked into paying a fee to collect a fake multi-million-dollar sweepstakes prize. The FTC alleged that operators of the scam, collectively known as Prize Information Bureau, sent personalized mailers, some with fictitious government agency names and official-looking seals, to hundreds of thousands of consumers.

The refund checks were mailed by an administrator working for the FTC. More than $183,000 was returned to consumers. The amount varied based upon the amount of each consumer’s loss. Those who receive the checks from the FTC’s refund administrator should cash them within 60 days of the date they were issued. The FTC never requires consumers to pay money or provide information before redress checks can be cashed. Consumers with questions should call the refund administrator, Gilardi & Co., LLC, at 1-888-251-6826, or visit www.FTC.gov/refunds.

To learn how to avoid these kinds of scams, read the FTC’s Prize Offers: You Don’t Have to Pay to Play.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to give information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics.  Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

#consumer, #consumer-topics, #facebook, #federal-trade-commission, #ftc, #limited-liability-company, #twitter, #unfair-business-practices